Saturday, October 29, 2011

Dit Da Jow: Part II

My Jow is finally ready!  I am posting my recipe to share.  It has been modified from a Hung Gar recipe provided by Master Rodney Morgan of The Iron Lotus Society.  I removed some of the more toxic ingredients, and even added a few from other recipes I studied.  Finally, I had my recipe refined by an herbalist at AOMA.

Awesome logo by my boyfriend.

K-JOW


Brew 6 weeks in one gallon of vodka or gin.  Use a dark glass or ceramic container.


Ingredients:

  • 18 g Hong Hua (Safflower): Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, promotes circulation.
  • 18 g Bai Zhi (White Angelica):  An "upper class herb" (implies safer, more effective).  Antipyretic (reduces fever), analgesic, antibacterial.
  • 18 g Du Huo (Angelica Pubescens Radix): Analgesic, anti-inflammation, sedative.
  • 30 g Mo Yao (Myrrh): Activates blood flow, relieve pain, and promote tissue regeneration.
  • 18 g E Zhu (Zedoaria Rhizome): Used as a spice, food coloring, and preservative.  May help improve immunity against cancer.
  • 30 g Ru Xiang (Frankincense): Make sure it is clear: no black or brown impurities.  Synergistic with Myrrh.  Used in traditional Asian medicine for digestion and healthy skin.
  • 18 g Niu Xi (Achyranthes Root): Stimulates blood flow.  Anti-inflammatory properties.
  • 18 g Hou Po (Magnolia Bark): Anti-inflammatory, analgesic.  Aids in relaxation of skeletal muscles.  Some antibacterial properties.
  • 18 g Chuan Xiong (Sichuan Lovage): Relatively nontoxic. Used to promote blood flow, remove blood stasis, and relieve pain.  
  • 18 g Yu Jin (Turmeric Tuber): Anti-inflammatory.  good for sprains, wounds, bruises, itchy skin.  Edible, with a strong yellow color.
  • 18 g Sheng Di Huang (Rehmannia Root): Can be used to stop bleeding.
  • 18 g Gui Zhi (Cinnamon Twig): Topical cinnamon has antimicrobial properties.  Too much may be irritating or cause allergic reactions.  Widens blood vessels to increase blood flow.
  • 9 g Rou Gui (Cinnamon Bark): See above.
  • 9 g Fang Feng (Siler Root): Antipyretic (reduces fever), analgesic, antibacterial effects.
  • 18 g Ji Xue Teng (Millettia Radix): Slows heart rate and lowers blood pressure.  Antibacterial, especially against staphylococci.  Used to improve blood tone, activate blood flow, loosen muscles and joints. 
  • 18 g Mu Dan Pi (Mountain Peony Bark): Antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, analgesic.
  • 9 g Mu Xiang (Auklandia Root): Believed to have anti-fungal, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer properties.
  • 18 g Yan Hu Suo (Corydalis Rhizome): Similar analgesic action to morphine, but much less potent.  Stimulates blood flow and relieves pain. 
  • 18 g Xu Duan (Dipsacus Root): Promotes white blood cells, strengthens muscles and bone.
  • 12 g Bai Shao Yao (White Peony): Promotes white blood cells, including lymphocytes.  Antispasmodic, sedative, analgesic, and antipyretic properties.
  • 9 g Tan Xiang (Sandalwood):  Regulate blood flow and stomach function.  Aromatic scent.
  • 9 g Xiao Hui Xiang (Fennel Seed): Protects against chemical-induced toxicity.  Used to normalize blood flow and relieve pain.


The finished product after 6 weeks. 

Bottled and ready to go!


Sources:

The Pharmacology of Chinese Herbs2nd. Ed., by Chang Huang
Chinese Herbs: Their Botany, Chemistry, and Pharmacodynamics, by John D. Keys
Herbs Dymystified: A Scientist Explains How the Most Common Herbal Remedies Really Work by Holly Phaneuf, PhD

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aucklandia_lappa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankincense
http://www.plumdragonherbs.com


Note that Dit Da Jow is for external use only.  Use at your own risk, and if you have questions, see a doctor.

Creative Commons License
K-JOW by Ann Kilzer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

1 comment:

  1. what are the amounts in grams for each ingredient??

    ReplyDelete